For F-sake-Friday

Today in England (Britain/Brutain/UK?) is 4Fawkes-sake-Friday! A special evening indeed, the first night following Diwali, whereby fireworks, firelight and even tealight-type celebrations were withheld from all public areas other than those supported by one or few local BBC radio station events (apparently). Not quite tonight being Firework Night (as that’s tomorrow), I’m here while resting in bed taking up a belated challenge while enjoying some recommended listening, hoping those plenty near-off noises are only fireworks and not mortar fire(!) Sparing, our few thoughts for those global neighbours in the vicinity of such atrocities as war and violations of civilian life – and resisting the evil influences of political propogandas whilst we have no way of knowing…

The first Friday of each month we have this thing titled ‘3Quotes’ within our sidebar thing titled ‘Friday Special Feature’ and the weekly features page. @piyushavir these pages are in need of at least setting to private members view only please while active members can perhaps manage front-end with only open-forum structure in the meantime please? Also, @sashay909 – hoping that you are happy for the generic clip-art logo and font-over placement that you created for Blogger’s World to remain as forum visual branding for community benefit? Much appreciation for your DTP skills in creating such a strong identifier (and assuming all members have and remain happy with this logo?)

Of course you can all gladly vote me off membership and I’ll visit and only use comment spaces if that’s more appropriate support and of greater benefit to the wider community… however…

Recommended reading #1 https://blogging101alumni.wordpress.com/about/

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100 Words Story – Unspoken Confessions

Hello everybody,
I am sorry for being so late with my Friday post. I was asked to step in at the last moment as there was a slot free for 100 words stories feature! I came up with this story at the last minute, please do share your feedback.

100 Words Story-

I gathered up all my courage that day and called her to the park near her house. My friend had said that I would never be able to tell her that I liked her. Incited, I bet him a cola that I would. I was waiting for her in the park and then, it rained. Drenched, I was worried she would never show up. Just then, I saw her in her polka-dotted dress carrying an umbrella. She looked at a girl passing by, and they exchanged a shy smile. Before I could say anything she said, “I am in love!”

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Prompt for August Friday Feature 100 Words Story!

This Friday’s 100 Word Story Prompt is: a phrase Continue reading

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Friday Feature : 3 Quotes

With the recent release of the Cursed Child, I thought let’s do this week’s Friday feature with quotes from an author who has the entire world going crazy over her books – J.K.Rowling!

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Friday Feature: 3 Quotes with Author Bio

I have always been an admirer of this great man whose words are ever so encouraging and make me wonder about his wisdom, knowledge and perspective of life!

SWAMI VIVEKANANDA. The name itself instills peace and divinity in mind.

Swami_Vivekananda

Swami Vivekananda’s inspiring personality was well known both in India and in America during the last decade of the nineteenth century and the first decade of the twentieth.

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Book Review – Karnali Blues: Story of Rural Nepal

Name of the Book: Karnali Blues

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Author: Buddhisagar

No. of pages: 398

Goodreads Rating: 4.15

Personal Rating: 4.5/5

Last April, while preparing for my exams, I also read Karnali Blues (though the name is English, the book is written in Nepali language) by Buddhisagar. The story is heavily based on the writer’s own experiences but he does not make the storytelling boring by adding long description. Within short and sweet sentences, he has been able to express a lot. The only drawback is that the writer does not explain to readers, the dialogues in Tharu and Khas language. Except that, the content of the book, especially the epilogue touched my heart.

Karnali Blues is a story about the experiences of a middle class family. The narrator remembers his childhood in Kailali and Kalikot as his father lies paralyzed in a hospital at Nepalgunj.

Karnali Blues is a story of growing up. The narrator is notorious as a child. He swims in the Amauri Khola (a distributary of the Karnali river), beats up people, steals things, sets his house on fire and asks for things which his father’s earnings can not sustain. But his father never complains. He provides the narrator everything he asks for. The narrator believes that his father is the best in the world.

But while his father lies on the deathbed, the narrator realizes that his father was the one who has suffered a lot. From leaving his family share in Surkhet to selling his pharmacy to Kalikot (more remote place), the narrator’s father has suffered a lot. And the narrator, too had been one of the causes of suffering. He had never obeyed what his father told. While he could have studied in Surkhet, he goes Kathmandu for higher studies following the whims of his friends. He has no job and is dependent on his parents despite their low income. By the end of the story, the narrator gains maturity in his thoughts.

Karnali Blues is about change. An excavator changes the village in which narrator lived most of his childhood. A bridge at Chisapani changes the fate of a town where his father ran a pharmacy. A change in mind takes the narrator to Kalikot instead of Surkhet. And his death changes the lives of his wife and son forever.

Karnali Blues is a story of life and death. An old Tharu lives on the bank of Amauri Khola because he has no children. A polio-struck child (friend of the narrator) leaves home in search of his brother because his father beats him up. The narrator’s family migrate to different places in search of better living. The narrator witnesses deaths of several people. A girl, who is a friend of narrator’s sister, dies of meningitis because her parents do not allow medication. “They buried her alive,” a villager says. A man named Hasan drowns. A porter from Kalikot, who takes the narrator there is killed by the soldiers calling him a Maoist. An old man dies in a hospital by coughing. And in the end, the narrator’s father dies.

In short, Karnali Blues is an apt description of the lives of poor people living in the rural area.

P.S.: You can read some English translations in the book’s Facebook page.

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TV Review: Kill Me, Heal Me

TV Review: Kill Me, Heal Me

Hello to all my dear friends at Bloggers World! It’s been  a while. I hope everyone is doing well.

Now coming to the topic at hand; this is my very first TV show review, and for the purposes of this review, I have chosen a Korean drama (any K-drama addicts here?) – Kill Me, Heal Me.

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Plot

The human body is capable of all sorts of things to survive difficult situations. Cha Do Hyun is a third-generation business heir who developed dissociative identity disorder (previously known as multiple personality disorder) in the aftermath of several life-threatening traumatic events. He tries to regain control over his life with the help of Oh Ri Jin, a first-year psychiatric resident who helps him secretly. But Ri Jin’s twin brother, Oh Ri On, is a writer who is determined to uncover the unscrupulous lives of the rich and starts following Do Hyun around. Can Do Hyun take control over his condition before one of his seven personalities takes control over him instead?

(source: Wikipedia)

My Take

First of all, the acting by our lead, Ji Sung, was commendable. It is a difficult job to get into the shoes of a hypothetical person and do justice to it. Ji Sung plays the role of Cha Do-hyun, our hero, who suffers from Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), more commonly known as Multiple Personality Disorder, Continue reading

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