Indian Muslim formed US foundation that provided aid to over 1 lac poor Indians in Covid-19

A US-based foundation provided aid to over 1 lakh poor Indians during Covid-19. The story of Syed Hussaini who formed the foundation is all about giving back to society.

Last year, the US-based Support for Educational and Economic Development or SEED USA foundation provided education, health, and monetary assistance to 1.1 lakh impoverished Indians.

Syed Suliman Hussaini left Hyderabad to further his education and would later serve others in his own nation. He witnessed the weakest members of Indian society get trapped in vicious debt cycles in order to meet basic requirements such as shelter, food, and medication.

Syed Hussaini established SEED USA in 2009. One of the most difficult issues, he has encountered in identifying the correct projects to engage in is ensuring that the impoverished attend school and the youth can make a living.

The story of Syed also shows that not all Muslims are terrorist as the media shows them. In fact, Islam is against terrorism and all such acts of violence that kills innocent people.  I have used the word Indian Muslim in the title because I am a Muslim and proud to be an Indian.

Syed graduated an engineer in 1972. However, due to a scarcity of appropriate occupations in the city, he was unable to find work. He saw an opportunity in the west and opted to pursue higher education there. After finishing his Masters, he relocated to Dallas because employment in his home country remained elusive.

But he knew the agonies of poverty, he says. Syed had lived without money before. The Nizam’s Charitable Trust granted Syed money as a scholarship back then, which paid for his plane ticket. That is how Syed did it. Otherwise, he says, if you lack money and resources, it might be extremely tough to build a name for yourself.

He then spent the following 26 years working in the corporate world. Syed retired in 2007 at the age of 60, when he believes he had the time to pursue this project. Syed’s brilliant career spanning over two decades could not have been possible if he had not gotten financial assistance. This thought stayed with him.

In order to assist poor kids in reaching their full potential, he launched SEED USA in 2009 with the help of like-minded volunteers. The foundation was registered with the US government and began soliciting donations from those who were willing to help.

Syed explains, the community has permitted all of this influence and he is just a medium. SEED USA, which operates as a charitable trust, enlists the Indian community in the west, as well as other willing individuals, to help improve the lives of students in India. According to Hussaini, the organisation is actively implementing a slew of programmes.

He explains, SEED USA seeks to help the impoverished go to school, allowing them to earn a living. His goal remains to ensure that people’s most basic needs are met and that young people may complete their education so that they can move on to build respectable lives for themselves and their children.

To achieve this kind of influence, multiple means such as print and digital media, as well as word of mouth, are used to publicise a call to action from philanthropists and assist Non-Resident Indians (NRIs). These donations are distributed through a variety of activities carried out by Foreign Contribution Regulation Act (FCRA) authorised NGOs in India. Finding the right initiatives to invest in has been one of the most difficult problems Syed has faced on his quest. With a defined goal in mind, the charity is steadfast in its adherence to legislation and selection of social organisations with whom it partners.

While many people seek out to collaborate and assist, the board’s first question is if they are FCRA certified. The Indian government issues this licence to regulate the receiving and use of foreign funds by Indian entities. One of the SEED projects that works to help women in need is the Widows and Destitute Families Support programme. In the absence of a breadwinner, these women can sustain themselves and their children through financial assistance and employment. In 2014, the SEED Foundation and Zohra Welfare Trust launched the Residential Vocational Training Institute in Karnataka to provide skill-based training to unemployed youngsters and school dropouts. Similarly, tuition for disadvantaged children is paid. In 2021, 800 college students will get scholarships.

Aside from that, the organisation has seeded free-for-all clinics in conjunction with healthcare-focused NGOs. Mujtaba Askari, the founder of Hyderabad’s Helping Hand Foundation, says that one such clinic, Rabia Clinic, is operated by them, from ambulances to treatment, and is sponsored by SEED. This clinic alone has the capacity to see up to 200 patients every day. There are approximately 13 such primary and diabetic clinics in Hyderabad, as well as one in Jagdishpur, Uttar Pradesh.

According to Syed Hussaini, SEED USA has provided financial assistance to a total of 1,50,000 underprivileged people in India this year. 18,000 of these children were enrolled in school. A total of 80,000 persons received free medical care.

This article has been edited from : https://www.thebetterindia.com/262100/syed-hussaini-seeds-usa-education-healthcare-employment-donation-nri-success/

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